Follow-up re: No Juice for Presidential Candidates in Syria

In my post on Thursday Feb. 20, 2020, Experts all over say shame on UN, international community, I wrote (referring mainly to Syria), “Now to queue up a recording of tonight’s Las Vegas Democrat presidential candidate debate and see how much air time they gave to striving to act decisively and comprehensively on negotiating help for our worst humanitarian crises around the world, or maybe just one of them.”

It was not on their agenda.  We can’t ignore that, nor the fact that the so-called “moderators” are not pressing for answers to the biggest cases of state-sponsored war crimes and humanitarian disasters in the world.  The “moderators” in these mockeries of debates are no better than the candidates they toy with.  They’re not debates.  They’re boxing matches.

We’re fortunate to have a reader here, Emilie, who wrote a comment on my prior post, pointing out Scott Simon’s editorial on the same topic on Saturday morning.  I added this to my earlier post, but wanted to make sure Emilie’s gift got seen, and I’ve added a couple more things here, to rattle Western minds with the bones of babies literally frozen to death in Syria:

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You get 61 trees for life

 

Nalini M. Nadkarni (photo source Univ. of Washington article)


In her 2008 book, Between Earth and Sky; Our Intimate Connections to Trees, Nalini M. Nadkarni wrote on page 43,
 
I calculated that the world supports sixty-one trees for each person on Earth [in 2005]. … When I told my husband […] he reflected for a moment and then voiced wonder that the ratio was so small.  “Each person gets sixty-one trees in a lifetime?  That seems hardly enough to supply just the firewood we’ll use in our woodstove for the next few winter seasons, let alone the lumber that’s in our house and the paper I put through my printer.”  His reflections […] reinforced the sense that I need to think about ways to look after my sixty-one trees, wherever they might be growing in the world.
 
To see how she arrived at 61 trees for each of us, see the two scanned images of her text below.

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