Leaf Melt Rumination and True Americans

About 600 words

“Small things amuse small minds.”

Five inch long American beech tree leaf resting at the bottom of a beech-leaf-shaped hole in ice, Balsamea, March 21, 2019

It’s amusing how much a leaf laying under water in an ice pocket can conjure rumination.  It’s not the kind of rumination that comes with an unquiet mind, that sort of out-of-control thinking that spirals endlessly into itself.  These icy leaf ruminations are just notions that sift through the synapses for no reason except that’s what we’re made to do with observations of Nature.  We’re made to be inspired by Nature to see things that small minds miss because they don’t see small things, or don’t pay attention to them.

Too bad more small minds are not amused by more small things.

Small things in Nature, that is.

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There’s Only One Nature – Joan D. Chittister, OSB

From Sister Joan D. Chittister, O.S.B.:

Joan D. Chittister

It’s what we have when we have nothing that defines our relation to nature and the effect of nature on the soul. Then we begin to realize that we do not exist outside of nature or above nature or independent of nature; we are simply its most vulnerable part. What we learn from nature may make the whole difference in the way we go through life, and what we want from it, and what we consider important in it, and—most of all—what we are capable of learning by being alive.  —from Becoming Fully Human by Joan Chittister (Sheed & Ward)

     

(Click pics for full-screen views.)  Views looking up under American Beech trees, abundant at Balsamea, fascinating in every season.  See my post, The Junk Tree (Fagus grandifolia) for many more home-made pictures and discussion.  Some foolish person called it a junk tree, not me.  I’m not THAT foolish.

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“What we learn from nature may make the whole difference in
… what we are capable of learning by being alive.” –JDC

Buddy Waits

                                       “I will wait for you.”

I can only imagine the wonders that Buddy enjoys in the woods of Balsamea every day and night, with his great capacity for scent, hearing, and night vision.

When he stops in the trail to investigate something, I wait.  It’s the least I can do for all the times he waits while I do things in my never-ending pursuit of amateur silviculture, naturalism, and trail tending.  Come to think of it, he spends most of his time waiting for me.

There never has been and never will be a friend so patient, so tolerant, so forgiving, so playful, and so nice to pet.  A good dog is medicine for mind and body.  Cats, too.  But you can’t take cats for a hike, and they’re generally not so big on tug-of-war and keep-away with a stick, in all seasons and all weather.

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