Historic Public Lands Legislation

This is a follow-up to my earlier post, Renew the EXPIRED Land and Water Conservation Fund #SaveLWCF of .

Congress passed a Public Lands Package (S.47) in nearly unanimous bipartisan fashion.

Source: Historic Public Lands Legislation About to Become Law – American Hiking Society

Every so often Congress overcomes its partisan battles and joins together to enact critical legislation. Today is one of those days! Congress just passed a Public Lands Package (S.47) in nearly unanimous bipartisan fashion (92-8 in the Senate and 363-62 in the House of Representatives). The legislation is far-reaching in scope (read it all here). Among the many provisions it creates new National Monuments honoring civil rights icons and Civil War heroes, provides over 1.3 million acres of new wilderness designations, and prohibits mining near two National Parks. Highlighted below are some of the key provisions for hikers and public land lovers.

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Non-essential people

REALLY, who needs federal employees, anyway?

I offer this post to connect personally with one kind of public servant we discard when we cut off their agency funding.  I hope this helps readers feel … well, just feel.

Meet Jim Hudgins, who was the Michigan Private Lands Coordinator for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for 25 years.

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Wise and Chatty Trees

“As you’re walking through the forest, under a single footprint there’s 300 miles of fungal mycellium stacked end on end. … Can you imagine the activity that’s going on there? … Can you imagine that every time you walk, you’re on this big superhighway with all this stuff moving around all over the place? It’s huge!” —The Science, Culture and Meaning of Forest Wisdom, a talk given by Dr. Suzanne Simard, Ph.D.

You might say this post is about the bio-psycho-social life of trees and people who study them, how a scientist became a forest ecologist, survived a grizzly bear multiple times trying to figure out how trees talk, and helped her Grandpa rescue their dog who had fallen into the outhouse hole.  Fun stuff!  I also want to recommend the book excerpted below.

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Global carbon emissions reached a record high in 2018. It’s not Kansas anywhere anymore, Toto.

Sing along: Somewhere over the rainbow oceans rise …

“The figures suggested there is no clear end in sight to the growth of humanity’s contribution to climate change.”Between 2014 and 2016, emissions remained largely flat, leading to hopes that the world was beginning to turn a corner. Those hopes appear to have been dashed. In 2017, global emissions grew 1.6 percent. The rise in 2018 is projected to be 2.7 percent.”

Source: ‘We are in trouble.’ Global carbon emissions reached a record high in 2018. – The Washington Post

Note from this blogger:  Climate science deniers needing medical treatment for your children please see your neighborhood priest or faith healer, who can also advise you on global climate matters, nutritional supplements, and social media propaganda tactics.